©2019 by IronAgeAudioworks

designed and made in Houston, TX

as discrete as possible

who, what, where and why

engineers

in the great state of Texas

fans of good design

passionate about music

that enjoy making things

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Chief Designer /

Managing Partner

Matt Walton, P.E.

Matt is a licensed professional engineer and a lifelong active musician who sings and plays bass guitar as his primary instrument.
 

He may not admit this, but those who know him well will say he can remember every single engineering formula that has ever hit his visual cortex, that he is a great amalgamist of theories and concepts and is well-versed in topics ranging from Greek, Philosophy, Science, any Wikipedia article he's ever read, Music and Sci-Fi Literature.


His design approach is the same whether he is designing furniture, electronics, or turbomachinery: Make it work wonderfully, make it robust, and make it beautiful.

Audio equipment has only one additional requirement: Make it sound really, really good.

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On design:


"We are passionate about design on two levels - practical and personal.

 

On a practical level, designs should simply work, with a minimum of fuss and effort by the user and an efficiency of resources and materials. 

On a personal level, I believe that good design must also be also elegant and beautiful. When you use our equipment you’re interacting with us through something we made, and that is extremely meaningful for us. We want that experience to be a good one."

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Master Builder /

Managing Partner

Fernando Romero, P.E.

The son of an electrical engineer and woodworker, Fernando grew up around plenty of solder wire and nails.

From an early age he sought diversion from taking apart anything held together by screws, and scavenging components from consumer electronics.

A more sophisticated game became navigating and testing continuity in circuits with a Simpson Electric Analog Multimeter and building LED lighting circuits for the family's LEGO cities.

Musical instruments were discovered in the home during his teenage years, igniting a desire to play and record music.

Once computers became available, lawn mowing savings went into purchasing what today is a vast catalog of obsolete audio interfaces and cheap consumer-grade audio gear.

His artistic influences and design inspirations include Bauhaus design, sans serif fonts, folk music, biographies of accomplished engineers and astronomers, Civil War bearded Generals (both north and south), and mystical Japanese manufacturing philosophies and methods.

Now a refined man, a learned man, a professional engineer,  he applies his skills to build real audio equipment the same way The Greats did generations before him.

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Chief Sherpa /

Partner

Chris Prucher

Growing up on a rural pig farm in Hawaii, and being extremely curious of the way things worked, Chris was constantly trying to understand why mechanical and electronic devices did what they did.

 

Chris had to learn to make do with what he had available to him at the time, which usually meant taking things apart, scrounging for parts and being forced to be creative with what was most definitely not the right tool for the job. Having learned good mechanical skills on the farm, Chris was drawn to automotive repair and automatic transmission electronic systems in particular. After becoming a ASE Certified Transmission mechanic and master diagnostician, Chris had the opportunity to take a college level Electronics course and the rest is history.

 

Having been an audiophile all his life and being in several bands Chris was naturally drawn to DIY audio gear, computer based recording and especially tubes and tube amplifiers.

 

With a little better understanding of electronics and a new love for audio engineering, Chris started a small recording studio that was basically a testing ground for his DIY builds. It’s when friends would not return the gear he was building and began asking him to build them one that he realized he was onto something.

 

When he presented a tube preamp of his own design to a highly regarded electronic engineer he was told that his “design works, but is pretty barbaric”. That statement stuck with him, so much so that he named his work Barbaric Amplification.

Chris encouraged the other two guys to build and trust their gut, and the rest is history again.